Taki NAKAZATO CERAMICS FOR THE ART OF TEA

Taki NAKAZATO
CERAMICS FOR THE ART OF TEA

中里 太亀 | ぼくのお茶 - 点茶のやきもの

3 - 20 January 2020

10:00 - 18:00
closed on Tuesday

karatsu kofuku chawan
Small tea bowl, karatsu-style

left/ ameyu sankaku hiire
Triangular incense burner, iron glaze
right/ ekaratsu rinka hiire
Incense burner with foliate rim, e-karatsu-style

karatsu nanban kensui
Waste water receptacle, unglazed wood fired

Tableware lies at the center of Taki’s daily work. As such, he throws a lot on the wheel and fires a lot in his nobori-gama. Taki’s ceramics show us that there is something that can only be achieved by doing it a lot: a natural freedom to create beautiful ceramics beyond the realm of artificiality. It looks like they grow right out of his hands. Being a member of one of the oldest potter families in Karatsu, Taki is also dedicated to tea ceramics. He practices the art of tea himself, so his tea ceramics show a very personal character and are perfect for use. In addition to bringing many tea bowls in different sizes and styles, Taki has also made a lot of less familiar tea utensils for our show — tea caddies (chaire), ash containers (haiki), water vessels (mizusashi), lid rests (futaoki), waste water receptacles (kensui), incense burners (hiire) — as well as tableware and small flower vases for use at home and in the tearoom.

e-karatsu chawan
Tea bowl, painted-karatsu-style

kohiki tataki mizusashi
Water vessel, paddling technique, white slip glaze

Taki’s tea utensils are cheerful and bright. The art of tea brings people together, and the character of Taki’s ceramics invites us to enjoy this communication from heart to heart. You know a good tool when its mere presence compels you to use it: “Well then, let’s enjoy a cup of tea!” This is the kind of sound that Taki’s tea ceramics emit.

kohiki suriotoshi kakehanaire
Hanging flower vase, wiped white slip glaze

karatsu nanban tataki tsubo
Vase, paddling technique, unglazed wood fired

中里 太亀|TAKI NAKAZATO
Born in Karatsu in 1965. After finishing school he learned pottery under his father, Takashi Nakazato. Taki opened his first solo exhibition in 1995. At “Ryutagama,” the kiln he shares with his father, he produces functional ceramics.

e-karatsu mizusashi
Water vessel, painted-karatasu-style